What to do with wildlife

What to do with wildlife

Compassionate people are as caring and concerned about wild animals (and birds) as they are about cats and dogs but are often unsure of how to handle situations affecting them.

They realise that the SPCA is a place of safety for animals, dogs and cats being the most commonly handled or admitted animals and that no animal is ever turned away. We care for farm and domestic animals. Wildlife is also accepted with indigenous animals being relocated to approved wildlife rehabilitation centres, noting that it is stressful for wild animals to be kept in a noisy environment where there are lots of unfamiliar smells.

RESCUING BIRDS

Prepare the container. Place newspaper or straw on the bottom of a cardboard box or cat/dog carrier with lid.

If it doesn’t have air holes, make some. For smaller birds you can use a paper sack with air holes.

Protect yourself. Wear gloves, if possible. Some birds may stab with their beaks, slice with their talons (claws) and slap with their wings to protect themselves, even if sick; birds commonly have parasites (fleas, lice, ticks) and carry diseases.

Cover the bird with a light sheet or towel.

Gently pick up the bird and put it into the prepared container-do not hold the bird across its chest as this can damage the crop and the internal organs of the bird which will kill it. The correct manner of holding a bird is as follows:

•Place a hand over the top of the bird very gently with your index finger and middle finger parting in a “V”. The neck of the bird should rest between the arches of the “V” as to stabilize its head and neck. With your other hand support the bottom of the bird and allow its feet to rest comfortably in your hand.

•Do not handle the bird with a tight grip as it just needs to be stable in the above position-do not handle unnecessarily.

Warm the bird if the weather is cold or if the bird is chilled. Put one end of the container on a heating pad set on low. Alternatively fill a zip-top plastic bag, plastic soft drink bottle with a screw lid, hot water bottle or rubber glove with hot water; wrap warm container with cloth and put next to bird.

Make sure the container doesn’t leak, or the bird will become wet and chilled.

Tape the box shut or roll the top of the bag closed.

Note exactly where you found the bird. This will be very important for release.

Keep the bird in a warm, dark, quiet place.

Do not give it food or water.

Leave the bird alone, don’t bother or handle it-stress is the biggest killer of rescued birds.

Keep children and pets away.

Contact a wildlife rehabilitator, nature conservation department or wildlife veterinarian as soon as possible.

Don’t keep the bird at your home longer than is necessary.

Keep the bird in a container; don’t let it loose in your house or car.

Wash your hands after contact with the bird. Wash anything the bird was in contact with – towel, jacket, blanket, pet carrier to prevent the spread of diseases and/or parasites to you or your pets.

Get the bird to a wildlife rehabilitator as soon as possible - it will be highly beneficial to the rehabilitators if you keep a record of any injuries you may have noticed when you found the bird as well as any information regarding the treatment of the bird whilst in your care ie. whether or not you have given it liquids, whether it has had any bowel movements.

NOTE: Egyptian geese lead their goslings to water a few days after hatching, often along busy streets. Do not “rescue” the goslings by separating them from their parents – rather escort the family through the traffic to the nearest pond.

RESCUING YOUNG MAMMALS

Prepare the container.

Place a clean, soft cloth with no strings or loops on the bottom of a cardboard box or cat/dog carrier with lid. If it doesn’t have air holes, make some.

Protect yourself. Wear gloves, if possible. Some animals may bite or scratch to protect themselves, even if sick; wild animals commonly have parasites (fleas, lice, ticks) and carry diseases.

Cover the animal with a light sheet or towel.

Gently pick up the animal and put it into the prepared container.

Warm the animal if the weather is cold or if the animal is chilled. Put one end of the container on a heating pad set on low.

Alternatively fill a zip-top plastic bag, plastic soft drink bottle with a screw lid, hot water bottle or rubber glove with hot water; wrap warm container with cloth and put next to animal.

Make sure the container doesn’t leak, or the animal will become wet and chilled.

Tape the box shut or roll the top of the bag closed.

Note exactly where you found the animal. This will be very important for release.

Keep the animal in a warm, dark, quiet place-stress is the biggest killer of wildlife which has been rescued.

Do not give it food or water.

Leave the animal alone, don’t bother or handle it.

Keep children and pets away.

Contact a wildlife rehabilitator, nature conservation department or wildlife veterinarian as soon as possible.

Don’t keep the animal at your home longer than is necessary.

Keep the animal in a container; don’t let it loose in your house or car.

Wash your hands after contact with the animal. Wash anything the animal was in contact with – towel, jacket, blanket, pet carrier – to prevent the spread of diseases and/or parasites to you or your pets.

Get the animal to a wildlife rehabilitator as soon as possible.

It will be highly beneficial to the rehabilitators if you keep a record of any injuries you may have noticed when you found the bird as well as any information regarding the treatment of the bird whilst in your care ie. whether or not you have given it liquids, whether it has had any bowel movements.

It is against the law to keep wild mammals/birds if you don’t have permits, even if you plan to release them.


Inserted: 07 June 2016

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